Recent Articles

Report: Firefighter Deaths at West Fertilizer Plant Could Have Been Prevented

The deaths of 10 volunteer firefighters who perished in the West fertilizer plant disaster in April 2013 were preventable, according to a long-awaited report released tonight by the State Fire Marshal’s Office.

The firefighters gave their lives to save their community and followed their training, the report finds, but didn’t have the resources or knowledge to fight a dangerous fire that involved a little-understood hazardous material.

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Immigrants Launch Hunger Strike in Texas Detention Center

Immigrants in a for-profit detention center in Conroe are refusing to eat to protest conditions at the facility. The protests in Texas follow a similar hunger strike that began two weeks ago at a Tacoma, Washington, detention center. Both facilities are owned by scandal-plagued GEO Group, the second-largest private prison company in the world. The protests are part of a wave of hunger strikes that immigrants have started in detention centers across the nation to call attention to what they say is the unjust practice of locking up immigrants and separating families through deportation.

The families of the detainees on Wednesday gathered outside the all-male Joe Corley Detention Facility north of Houston to call on jail officials not to retaliate against the hunger strike leaders. Adelina Caceres said that her partner, David Vasquez, has been kept in solitary confinement at Corley as punishment for helping to start the strike. Vasquez has been in the detention center for nearly a year, she said.

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Denton Residents Propose Fracking Ban

A group of Denton residents launched an effort Tuesday to outlaw fracking within the city.

If the Denton Drilling Awareness Group succeeds in getting the ban on the ballot and if Dentonites pass the measure in November, Denton will become the first city in Texas to make fracking illegal. Cities in other states have already passed similar laws, but Denton would be the first with existing fracking permits to do so.

The possibility of a city in Texas—a state that accounts for one-third of U.S. natural gas production—making it illegal to frack is sure to rattle the industry. Dallas passed a de facto ban on fracking in December when it adopted prohibitive setback requirements for natural gas wells, but it still didn’t outright make fracking illegal. And Dallas isn’t Denton.

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